SURREY, BC – Consistent with the preceding two months, June saw a record-setting number of sales for the month historically, but continued easing off since this year’s sales peak in March.

The Fraser Valley Real Estate Board processed 2,864 sales of all property types on its Multiple Listing Service® (MLS®) in June, an increase of 18.7 per cent compared to June 2015. The previous record for sales processed in a June was set in 2005 at 2,517. However, when compared to May 2016, sales dipped 1.5 per cent.

With 1,281 sales of single family detached homes, demand for greater space and land remained consistent. However, nearly matching that was the combined total of June’s 656 townhome sales and 604 apartment sales, a rare feat for the Fraser Valley region.

“Demand for Fraser Valley homes grips the market, tightly. Still, we are seeing a slight leveling-off that while not drastic, is giving both buyers and sellers a bit more room to maneuver,” said Charles Wiebe, President of the Board.

The Board received 3,705 new listings in June, an increase of 11.7 per cent compared to June of last year, and a 0.8 per cent increase from May 2016. The total active inventory for June was 5,612, down 30.8 per cent from last year’s 8,105 active listings at this time.

Across Fraser Valley, the average number of days to sell a single family detached home in June 2016 was 17 days, compared to 35 days in June 2015.

"Simply put, to meet demand, we need even more listings. More than half of our active inventory consists of new listings that came on to the MLS® in June; our market is truly in the hands of hopeful sellers,” added Wiebe.

“If you're a struggling buyer, or someone thinking of selling but on-the-fence, talk to a REALTOR® and find your best path through this complex environment.”

The MLS® HPI benchmark price of a Fraser Valley single family detached home in June was $861,600, an increase of 41.3 per cent compared to June 2015 when it was $609,900.

In June, the benchmark price of townhouses was $387,100, an increase of 27.9 per cent compared to $302,600 in June 2015. The benchmark price of apartments also increased year-over-year by 20.8 per cent, going from $191,900 in June 2015 to $231,900 in June 2016.

 

Full package:
http://www.fvreb.bc.ca/statistics/Package%20201606.pdf

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You’ve seen fire extinguishers in commercial environments, such as schools, stores and workplaces. Does it make sense to have one in your home?

According to the experts, yes. In fact, a fire extinguisher can quickly put out a blaze that would otherwise quickly grow out of control.

There are several types of fire extinguishers that are made especially for residential use. That means they put out the most common fires that occur in the home (Class A, B & K fires), and they are easy to handle and use.

Since most residential fires happen in the kitchen, that’s the best place to keep your extinguisher. Make sure everyone in your household knows where it is and how to use it. Keep in mind that a home fire extinguisher is meant for small fires that are easy to put out, such as a pan of vegetable oil igniting on the stove. If you find you can’t control the blaze within a few seconds with the extinguisher, get everyone out of the home and call the fire department. Also, never attempt to fight a major fire yourself.

Leave that to the professionals

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Setting the right list price for a home is a mystery for many sellers.

How do you begin to determine what buyers are likely to pay for your property? After all, no two homes are exactly alike. Yet, setting the right price is crucial.

You need to avoid the two price “tipping points” that, if crossed, can cause you a lot of problems.

The first tipping point is a price that’s low enough for buyers to begin thinking something is wrong. They wonder, “Why is your price so low? What are you not telling us about your property?” But that’s not even the worst problem with this tipping point. If you do get offers at that low price, you’ll have a bigger issue – leaving thousands of dollars on the table.

The other tipping point is setting your price so high it discourages buyers from giving your listing a second look. When your price is that high, you’ll get few enquiries and even fewer people coming to see your property. Of course, you can lower your price later, if necessary. But experience shows that reduced prices make potential buyers skeptical. Most sellers who price high in the hopes of getting a windfall actually end up selling for much less than they would have if they had priced their properties correctly in the first place.

So what’s the right price to list your property? The answer is somewhere inbetween those two tipping points.

 

Call today and I will help you determine the right price for your property.

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The data relating to real estate on this website comes in part from the MLS® Reciprocity program of either the Real Estate Board of Greater Vancouver (REBGV), the Fraser Valley Real Estate Board (FVREB) or the Chilliwack and District Real Estate Board (CADREB). Real estate listings held by participating real estate firms are marked with the MLS® logo and detailed information about the listing includes the name of the listing agent. This representation is based in whole or part on data generated by either the REBGV, the FVREB or the CADREB which assumes no responsibility for its accuracy. The materials contained on this page may not be reproduced without the express written consent of either the REBGV, the FVREB or the CADREB.